For more information please contact us:

 

 Teaching School Administrator
Denbigh School, Burchard Crescent,

Shenley Church End, Milton Keynes, MK5 6EX

Tel: (01908) 330529, DenbighTSA@denbigh.net

FORMAT: Full day
 

VENUE:
Denbigh School
Burchard Crescent
Shenley Church End
Milton Keynes MK5 6EX

 

DATE:
Thursday 9th October 2014

 

TIMES:
9.00am-3.00pm

 

FEES:
£200 per participant

 

BOOKING DEADLINE:
2 weeks prior to start date

 

Refreshments provided

 

 

To apply for this course or make an enquiry please click the link above.

 

The course will look at the statistics behind boys’ underachievement: why some boys do very well indeed, how sexism in society encourages ‘laddish’ underachievement, how girls and boys learn to conform and how teacher expectations often hold kids back.


The course will look at the evidence from schools where boys perform well, we will expose the pervasive pseudoscience, examine the role of narcissism, ‘excuse culture’ and examine conformism and homophobic bullying.


The course will demonstrate that the ‘gender gap’ is a bit of a red herring; we’ll demonstrate how poverty and social disadvantage are the root causes of educational underachievement and we’ll examine what actually works in the classroom.


This course aims to
- Look beyond the headline-grabbing hysteria and stereotypes of underachievement
- Give a historical perspective on boys’ academic underachievement
- Analyse culture and subculture and how we can only talk about some boys and some girls
- Pre-empt underachievement through targeted early intervention
- Examine the role of social class and cultural capital in underachievement
- Encourage a rethink of ‘the boy problem’

 

Course Outline
Session 1: The Gender Gap
- The true extent of the gender gap
- The relative importance of the gender gap
-  Why we can only talk about some boys
-  The interplay between gender, class and race

 

Session 2: The Typical Male
- Societal expectations of men and boys
- The socialisation process in schools and beyond
- Conformity, homophobia and bullying in schools
- The ‘Pygmalion Effect’ in reverse

 

Session 3: The Strategies that Work
- Where boys do very well indeed
- The evidence against gender-based teaching
- The ‘science’ to avoid
- Planning for the future

Course Details

Raising Boys' Achievement - Fully updated and linked to the latest inspectorate thinking. (Primary)